About me

I spent many years working in local government before deciding to train as a therapist. In addition to my private practice, I work as Counselling Coordinator at Help Counselling Centre in Notting Hill. I have a special interest and experience in working with bereavement and loss including traumatic loss such as suicide. I also have special interests in the areas of eating issues, infertility, pregnancy and post natal issues as well as multiple births.

Sinead Gannon, 2016
Sinead Gannon, 2016

My approach

My approach is to cultivate a warm, professional and safe environment which in turn fosters the potential towards growth and healing that I believe is inherent in all of us.

As a therapist, I am trained to listen to you and offer you my undivided attention during our meetings. I will not tell you what to do or how to live your life. Nor will I be involved with your everyday life. I offer a safe, confidential and non-judgemental space for you to explore your issues. I provide honest feedback which can help you to find a way forwards that feels right for you.

My training in Counselling and Psychotherapy was an integrative training which means that I studied all of the key theoretical approaches and can draw on these to create a unique therapy for each client.

The following approaches are most influential in my work:

Psychodynamic:

Focusing on early life and how our past experiences influence our present. Can help us work through why we keep repeating old patterns in relationships.

Transpersonal:

Focusing on wholeness, who the client is beyond the ‘persona’ they present to the outside world. In this approach, all of life’s experiences (however difficult) are considered to have meaning. Potentially, they can become valuable and growth-enhancing.

Humanistic:

Focusing on self-development, growth and responsibilities. Recognising the client’s strengths, creativity and choice in the ‘here and now’.

Research shows that it is the relationship between the therapist and the client which is the key to successful therapy and it is this, rather than the theoretical orientation of the therapist which is of the utmost importance.